January 7, 2019

Orna Guralnik, PsyD at ICP - Friday, Feb. 8



Register at icpnyc.org/sicp/

There are 3 lectures remaining in this year's
lecture series, including this one.


Individual Lectures
Current trainee or student  $20
SICP Member  $35
General Admission  $40


There is a $10 per lecture surcharge 

for registration at the door.
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Friday, February 8
7-9 pm. Doors open at 6:30


In the ICP Library, 1841 Broadway, 4th floor
New York, NY 10023 (enter on 60th Street)
____________________


About lectures, contact Barbara Bolas, PhD
at sicp.lectures.barbara@gmail.com


SICP membership is by the calendar year.
To join SICP, contact Betsy Levine, LCSW
at sicp.lectures@gmail.com


CE credits are issued under the auspices of
The Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy




October 24, 2018

SICP Lecture Series 2018-19



SICP Lecture Series 2018-19

































Register at icpnyc.org/sicp/
Wednesday, Nov 7

Beatrice Beebe, PhD

Microanalysis of Mother-Infant Communication
The origins of disorganized attachment

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Friday, Feb 8  

Orna Guralnik, PsyD

A State of Mind
Dissociation in the service of the collective

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Friday, March 15   

Holly Levenkron, LCSW, LICSW

The Interpersonal Play of
“Resilience and Doom”

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Friday, May 3

Ron Taffel, PhD
The Schwartz Memorial Lecture

Millennials Rising!
Toward a Treatment Relationship for Changing Sensibilities


----
Register at icpnyc.org/sicp/

You will see the Full Series pass as well as the
individual lectures. There is a $10 per lecture
surcharge for registration at the door.

Full Series Pass
Current trainee or student  $70
SICP Member $120
General Admission  $140

Individual Lectures
Current trainee or student  $20
SICP Member  $35
General Admission  $40
____________________

Three Fridays and a Wednesday
7-9 pm. Doors open at 6:30

In the ICP Library, 1841 Broadway, 4th floor
New York, NY 10023 (enter on 60th Street)
____________________

About lectures, contact Barbara Bolas, PhD
at sicp.lectures.barbara@gmail.com

To join SICP, contact Betsy Levine, LCSW
at sicp.lectures@gmail.com

CE credits are issued under the auspices of
The Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy





_______________________


Register at icpnyc.org/sicp/

Wednesday, Nov 7

Beatrice Beebe, PhD

Microanalysis of Mother-Infant Communication
The origins of disorganized attachment

Research on the origins of disorganized attachment will be presented, illustrated by films and frame-by-frame analyses. Disorganized  attachment poses the torturous paradox that the infant’s source of safety is also a source of threat and alarm. The findings demonstrate that remarkable dysregulations of attention, affect, spatial orientation, and touch at 4 months predict disorganized attachment at one year. We infer from the results that the future disorganized infant has difficulty feeling  known by his mother, for example as she shows smile/surprise  expressions to his distress; has difficulty knowing his mother, for example, as she“closes up” her face and becomes inscrutable; and has difficulty knowing himself, for example, in moments of discrepant affect, smiling and whimpering in same second. Since disorganized attachment at 12 months predicts dissociative difficulties in young adulthood, understanding these interactions offers insight into adult psychopathology and transference. This research is linked to theories of the origins of dissociation in adulthood: inescapable threat, failures of integration, and failures of recognition. Threatening/threatened, dysregulated and dissociated patterns of interaction in infancy may have analogues in adult treatment.

Beatrice Beebe, PhD is Clinical Professor of Psychology (in Psychiatry), College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute. She directs a basic research lab on mother-infant communication. She is faculty at several psychoanalytic institutes, and she has a private practice for adults and mother-infant pairs. She is author or co-author of 6 books. The most recent is The mother-infant interaction picture book: Origins of attachment (Beebe, Cohen & Lachman, Norton, 2016). For a decade she directed a pro bono primary prevention project for mothers who were pregnant and widowed on 9-11 (Beebe, Cohen, Sossin, & Markese, Eds., Mothers, infants and young children of September 11, 2001: A primary prevention project, 2012). A documentary film about her research is available (website of the Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing [PEPweb], Mother-Infant Communication: The Research of Dr. Beatrice Beebe, by Karen Dougherty, 2016).
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Friday, Feb 8  

Orna Guralnik, PsyD

A State of Mind
Dissociation in the service of the collective

Following her empirical and clinical work with people suffering with dissociation and depersonalization, in this lecture Dr. Guralnik will propose that the intimate link between culture and the subject is established through spell states and dissociative mechanisms.  Guralnik will summarize current mainstream models of dissociation and introduce a model of dissociation that incorporates ways in which ideology is inscribed in us through the workings of hypnotic states.

Engaging in an honest investigation of how the political inheres in the personal has become urgent for psychoanalysis in the wake of the current administration, the tensions surrounding identity politics, and powerful movements such as #MeToo and #BlackLivesMatter.  In this talk Dr Guralnik will propose that socio-political realities, such as the divisions by race, nationalism, or gender, are maintained by engaging us all in states of enchantment/trance.  Guralnik will touch upon daily experiences, film and pop culture, as well as clinical material, to introduce the concept of interpellation and to discuss the mind’s desire to enter dissociative spell-states. The audience will be invited to engage in discussion.


Orna Guralnik, PsyD is a clinical psychologist and psychoanalyst. She is on faculty at the National Institute for the Psychotherapies and the Stephen Mitchell Center; visiting scholar at PINC and NCSPP; co-editor of the Psychoanalytic Dialogues Blog; and associate editor of Psychoanalytic Dialogues and Studies in Gender & Sexuality. Dr. Guralnik co-founded the Center for the Study of Dissociation and Depersonalization at the Mount Sinai Medical School and publishes on the topics of dissociation, depersonalization, and socio-politics.
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Friday, March 15   

Holly Levenkron, LCSW, LICSW

The Interpersonal Play of
“Resilience and Doom”

For many of us, a sense of competency or failure can feel like fluctuating sides of a coin - as when connection is quickly replaced with despondence; impetus and excitement readily deflate and vaporize. During interactions as well as in pursuing ideals, we can feel stuck in beliefs that “close the field”. We lose the ability to navigate the affective shifts necessary to hold a questioning attitude. How do reverie and the analyst’s reflective function help us engage with, play within, question, and regulate, the states that signal shame, anger and doom. How do we “open the field”?

Considering that the analyst’s clinical focus on content can foreclose capacities for interpersonal “resilience” and “movement”, I ask how working more “affectively” helps develop these capacities. Using clinical vignettes we will discuss two related functions I call “earnest recognition” and “authentic voicing” to foster “opening the field”. How does this approach enhance mutual empathy, flexibility and hope in personal endeavors and as therapeutic action? I draw from Relational Field Theory to illustrate my points and process.

Holly Levenkron, LCSW, LICSW received her training in psychoanalysis at ICP, the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy in NYC where she is a faculty member and supervisor as well as Director of the Psychoanalytic Training Program. She also is faculty and supervising analyst at MIP, the Massachusetts Institute for Psychoanalysis. For many years she has been teaching Relational Theory, with a special interest in enactment, dissociation, affect and Comparative Field Theory, the latter which she will teach as part of a 6 week Zoom seminar this Fall for the Australian branch of the IARPP. She has published in Psychoanalytic Inquiry and Contemporary Psychoanalysis and has presented at numerous conferences both nationally and internationally. In addition to her work in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy, she specializes in working with Couples and with Adult Autism (Asperger’s Syndrome). She maintains a private practice in New York City and Cambridge, MA.

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Friday, May 3

Ron Taffel, PhD
The Schwartz Memorial Lecture

Millennials Rising!
Toward a Treatment Relationship for Changing Sensibilities

Millie and Irv Schwartz were iconoclastic visionaries. But even they might be stunned by the staggering increase in mental health issues of today’s young adults and their dramatic emergence as a positive, transformational force in the culture. 

Millennials approximately 18 - 35 years old, constitute the country’s largest, most diverse demographic and extensive research about young adults reveals that they are immersed in extraordinary life paradoxes. Raised in child-centered yet often distracted, disorganized families, chronically inflamed by numbing financial, social and class stressors, and intimately engaged in far flung online universes, it is no surprise that they enter psychoanalysis and psychotherapy with seemingly incongruous expectations – asking us to provide a calming, secure attachment, while simultaneously looking to us for the spark of an intensely interactive, deeply personal and even unpredictable presence.

Case examples will illustrate several suggestions toward a treatment relationship that matches changing sensibilities: staying remembered between sessions when life is a blur; providing the non-linear self-disclosure and role-fluidity increasingly needed for today’s patients to feel securely held; addressing fault-lines of implicit bias in the dyad; giving advice without losing the frame; using digital pathways on the royal road to the unconscious; and, engaging in impassioned dialogue during the “in-betweens” of a session to discover unspoken, dissociated selves. Clinicians struggle with these paradoxes every day, as those we shepherd through contemporary vulnerabilities, lead us to where we’ve never been.

Ron Taffel, PhD has lectured extensively nationwide, is the author of eight books and over 100 professional and popular articles translated into numerous languages. Dr. Taffel’s training in adult psychoanalytic, family and child therapy led to his  focus on the intersectionality of the socio-political context, human development and various treatment modalities. Taffel’s works include The Politics of Mood, In Search of the Unspoken Self, Childhood Unbound, The New Anxiety, and The Divided-Self of Adolescents. Taffel has been featured in The New York Times, and has appeared on and consulted to numerous TV programs and documentary films.  Dr. Taffel is Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Institute for Contemporary Psychotherapy and Founding Director of ICP’s Family and Couples Treatment Service. 






Register at icpnyc.org/sicp/